A Historic Home Goes From Peeling Gray To Beautiful Blue

A Client In Ann Arbor Hires Us To Paint An Old House Exterior A Beautiful New Color
Newly painted historic home in Ann Arbor

It may not be the same historic house paint, but our client loves the new look of their older home. You just might too after seeing how it turns out!

In this post, you can see our process for painting historic homes. You can also see how our client’s project turns out.

Finally Beautiful Again!

“Did you see that historic home in Burns Park getting painted?” asks Sarah.

“I haven’t been that way for a week or so,” replies Jason as Sarah throws her keys in the key dish. “How’s it looking?” he asks.

Sarah smiles. “You can judge that for yourself. The same people who paint our house are the ones who painted it. I looked on their YouTube page and saw they have a video on it.”

“I wonder how much exterior painting costs?” muses Jason. “Well, anyway, want to watch that video together?” asks Jason. “If it’s happening in our town I think we should know about it and make sure it looks good, you know?” Sarah smiles and nods, taking out her phone.

Here’s what the couple sees:

How To Paint An Old House Back To Beautiful

  1. Prep work to protect the home
  2. Scrape off peeling paint
  3. Clean paint chips
  4. Caulk and seal
  5. Tape and protect windows and doors
  6. Paint the siding and trim

The colors are Manitou Blue (SW 6501) for the main siding and Whitetail (SW7103) for the trim, both by Sherwin Williams.  

Why We Love Historic House Painting Projects

We feel like we’re protecting and being a part of the history of our beautiful city. The color we leave behind makes a positive impact on the area. We want our entire city to look amazing and will do what we can to help make that happen.

Project Problems

Painting a historic home

Height and space. Painting a two-story house in a smaller yard is difficult. You need to know how to set up and move ladders without damaging anything.

Storms. We had a couple of storms move in, slowing down our timeline. To keep the paint from running or being otherwise ruined, we had to be careful when we did each step.

Heat. The heat was pretty bad a lot of the time. We had to make sure to stay hydrated and keep as cool as we could.

Parking guards. They didn’t make it easy, but we managed to pull through without an incident.

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“That looks way better than the peeling gray it was!” says Jason happily. Sarah nods. “It sure does! We should take a look at some of the other projects they’ve done around here.”